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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
told npr, i don't want to abolish government, i want to reduce it to the size where i can drag it into the bathroom and drown it in the bathtub. andrea mitchell, nbc news, washington. >>> up next, the royal wedding dress and the princess who wore it. great britain's new crown jewel. >>> if you were left off the guest list of the royal wedding earlier this year, this could be the next best thing, a chance to check out the dress worn by kate middleton, the royal family's newest, brightest star. >> reporter: her moment of royal glory, kate's official arrival on the global stage. her dress was the other star of the show. today at buckingham palace, crowds waited for hours for a closeup look at a new display opening today. last week the queen and the new duchess got a sneak preview but didn't quite have the planned reaction. >> horrible isn't it? >> reporter: without kate in it, the dress appears ghost-like. still half a million fans are expected. >> she seems very sweet and she's very pretty, and she seems very nice. >> kate's memorabilia will raise millions for the monarchy, turni
npr can function just fine on its own. that would be nearly $1 billion a year, $10 billion over a decade, if we just cut out those two programs. there many places we could cut that we're spending on programs that we do not need, wasteful programs. when the gao cn find $200 billion in cuts, that a significant. host: in your view, what is the proper role of government? guest: xiii, the government is ordained by god. punish those who do evil and reward those which is right. the government should be maintaining law and order and to be fostering a society in which exemplary behavior is rewarded and less than exemplary behavior is not. and there's a moral symmetry to the society. i think government and the country as wealthy as ours, we should be looking out for the welfare and health of the people within the ability of the government and the ability of the country to pay we cannot do everything. that is part of the problem. washington has been tried to do everything. they have been kicking the can down the road. now we've reached the place we can no longer can get down the road. we'r
for the misdeeds. we talk to john burns of "the new york times" and david folkenflik of npr. >> brown: then, we ask nuclear regulatory commission chair gregory jaczko if u.s. reactors could withstand an earthquake like the one that devastated japan. >> ifill: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on the challenges and the troubles facing one of the world's largest democracies. >> it made tremendous strides politically and economically but still struggles with corruption. >> brown: kwame holman updates the budget battles as the house and senate offer dueling plans for reducing the deficit. >> ifill: and judy woodruff explores the deadline-driven deal cutting underway with political editor david chalian. >> brown: plus, in a season of tornadoes, floods and more, we get some poetic perspective on the beauty and power of nature. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind,
in the coins and use the miles to travel the globe almost free. but as first reported by npr, taxpayers haven't faired as well. is this program a waste of taxpayer money. >> the dollar coin program is a waste of taxpayer money. i think it's time to put a halt to this experiment. >> reporter: but ending it probably requires another law from congress. until then, the mint has five years and 20 presidents to go. lisa myers, nbc news, baltimore. >>> still ahead, the big showdown in washington over the debt limit. and the president's warned of potential catastrophe. so are lawmakers any closer to a deal? >>> and a sunday surprise for those dire predictions of carmageddon in california. i have copd. if you have it, you know how hard it can be to breathe and what that feels like. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms... by keeping my airways open a full 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. and it's steroid-free. spiriva does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sud
: grover norquist bottom line? he once told npr, i don't want to abolish government, we want to reduce it to the size where he can drag it into the bathroom and drown it in the bathtub. andrea mitchell, nbc news, washington. >> up next, the royal wedding dress and the princess who wore it. great britain's new crown jewel. happened to come across quicken loans online. [ chris ] walked over to the computer... i was able to see all the paperwork. while i was on the phone, i was able to go through the checklist. [ kathy ] they were quick and efficient. quicken loans is definitely engineered to amaze. they were just really there for us. i don't always have time to eat like i should. that's why i like glucerna shakes. they have slowly digestible carbs to help minimize blood sugar spikes, which can help lower a1c. [ male announcer ] glucerna. helping people with diabetes find balance. [ male announcer ] glucerna. wh your eyes are smiling... you're smiling. and when they're laughing... you're laughing. be kind to your eyes... with transitions lenses. transitions adapt to changing light so you
reported by npr, taxpayers haven't faired as well. is this program a waste of taxpayer money? >> the dollar coin program is a waste of taxpayer money. i think it's time to put a halt to this experiment. >> reporter: but ending it probably requires another law from congress. until then, the mint has five years and 20 presidents to go. lisa myers, nbc news, baltimore. >>> still ahead, the big showdown in washington over the debt limit. and the president's warned of potential catastrophe. so are lawmakers any closer to a deal? >>> and a sunday surprise for those dire predictions of carmageddon in california. >>> a little more than two weeks left until the u.s. treasury reaches its legal borrowing limit and the threat of the government being unable to pay its bills looms larger tonight. nbc's mike viqueira joins us from the white house. mike? >> reporter: lester, we're 16 days from a potential financial catastrophe. by all appearances it was a quite typical weekend summer day here in washington. the first family left on foot, setting out across lafayette park to attend church services. it was t
at npr. skip over our speaker for a moment, over the podium as well, melissa sharp with new silk media. she is our fantastic speakers committee chair. skip over our second speaker for a moment, the key to seem to press secretary with the natural resources defense council. also the organizer of today's event. we thank you for that, bob. we are told that it is a vote and we are awaiting another guest of the speaker, congressman brad miller of north carolina. then moving on down, andrea stone, correspondent for "huffington post." glow is washington director of reporters without borders and a vital member of our press freedom member and al isley is editor at large who tells me been blogging for "huffington post" since day one. now please a large amount of applause for everyone. [applause] >> if there were a king and queen of online journalism, our headline to a guest speakers could be considered candidates for members of the royal family. when tim armstrong and arianna huffington announced aol's purchase of "huffington post" in february it marked not just yet another reshaping of aol but a
it is people npr? why not just concentrate on the basic? >> i don't believe so. like it or not they me have a strong interest in policing. they put significant demands on the metropolitan police and officers are doing their investigation, wanting information. the police officers would be spending their time trying to deal with that approach. and i feel a having press officers in place, that we are able to take the pressure off the investigative officers to get on with their jobs, and if the main press officers -- [inaudible] >> could some savings be made in your department? >> there's always savings to be made. my department has contributed in the last 10 years. >> could we make a quick, please? >> mr. fedorcio, you were the main contact at the met with some of these journalist. your name all over meetings. it's important to be transparent about these things and the met has a publication about what we've are discussed. when i look on line however, it appeared as no gift hostile these passionate hospitality since 2009. 12 lunches, two dinners. was what's going on, were you trying to not tell
. let's try out this one, a quote from president obama on npr. he said, ronald reagan repeatedly talked about how irresponsible it would be to allow the full faith and credit of the united states to be impaired in any way. what's verdict on that one? >> we rated this one mostly true. we dug into the historical documents and we found reagan did say the u.s. should pay its debts and it should not be in document now, presidents usually support increases to the debt ceiling while congress comp plain it we know that, rated mostly true. >> finally, it one from victoria jackson, she's comedian and tea party supporter. a clause niptd obama care bill, which is now law, gives obama the right to form a private army. what do we make of that? >> this one got the pants on fire. it seemed to be a serious commentary so we took it seriously and checked it. the health care law does expand the public health service, which has a uniformed commission corps, but doctors and nurses, not members of the military no private armies in the health care bill. >> she is a comedian, maybe she was joke, we will give he
experience at npr which happens last year when you were fired. you have done a quick turn around on a book, fantastic book called "muzzled". a great title because you felt like you were muzzled in the situation there. right? >> yeah, you know, something -- again, we're talking about the budget debate this morning and i think you guys are right on target. when you say look, people are talking about -- i've got this plan, i've got that plan. here's my message to the voters. here's this message. say, you know, we don't need competing plans. we need a deal. we need people who are going to talk to each other and offer not only the ability to speak and shout and use bumper sticker slogans but actually listen to each other and then compromise and reach a deal in service to the american people. and what i've had in my experience after i got fired was so many people came up to me and said, you mean because you get nervous at airports when you see people in muslim garb after 9/11, you got fired? you know, i have a similar feeling and the people start to say i can't talk about certain things or some
, ceo of the aspen institute. senior business editor at npr, and we will skip over our speaker for just a moment, melissa is our fantastic speakers' committee chair and for that we will be eternally grateful. get over our second speaker for a moment, and we have a senior press secretary with the natural resources defense council and the organizer of today's event. we are told there is a vote and we are awaiting another guest of the speaker, congressman brad miller of north carolina. that will add to the drama today, whether he actually makes it to the head table. andrea stone of huffington post , the washington director of reporters without borders and a vital member of our press freedom committee, an editor at large who has been blogging for huffington post since day one. now, please, a larger round of applause for everyone. if there were a king and queen of on-line journalism, our headline duo of guest speakers could be considered candidates or members of the royal family. it is not just another reshaping of aol, but a redefinition of the on-line news business. less than six months la
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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